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Moving an iSCSI connected Drobo
02-20-2017, 09:48 AM
Post: #1
Moving an iSCSI connected Drobo
Just being cautious here - I have a user with a DroboPro that is currently being used as a backup store for Veeam. Veeam server is a VMware VM (6.0x) box. The Drobo is connected by iSCSI and there have been no problems with the device, connection or server etc.
I have a new Veeam server that I'd like to move the Drobo to and turn off the old server. When I run the Windows iSCSI Initiator on the new server, I see the target but cannot connect to it. That's okay, as I don't want multiple devices connecting to the Drobo.
Here's when my caution kicks in. Is connecting the Drobo to the new server as simple as disconnecting the Drobo in Windows Disk Manager and then disconnect the LUN's in the iSCSI Initiator configuration and then reversing the process on the new server?
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04-03-2017, 11:43 AM
Post: #2
RE: Moving an iSCSI connected Drobo
(02-20-2017 09:48 AM)emjaydee Wrote:  Just being cautious here - I have a user with a DroboPro that is currently being used as a backup store for Veeam. Veeam server is a VMware VM (6.0x) box. The Drobo is connected by iSCSI and there have been no problems with the device, connection or server etc.
I have a new Veeam server that I'd like to move the Drobo to and turn off the old server. When I run the Windows iSCSI Initiator on the new server, I see the target but cannot connect to it. That's okay, as I don't want multiple devices connecting to the Drobo.
Here's when my caution kicks in. Is connecting the Drobo to the new server as simple as disconnecting the Drobo in Windows Disk Manager and then disconnect the LUN's in the iSCSI Initiator configuration and then reversing the process on the new server?

Short answer, yes. Take the disk "offline" in Windows. Then remove the iSCSI configuration in Windows. This will make sure your data is preserved. Then, on the new system, reconfigure iSCSI target and mount the LUN. Make sure to keep your drive letter the same so that when you restore the Veeam configuration you don't have to import your backups (not that it's a big deal but it can be time consuming).

I would then look to not use iSCSI mounts inside virtual machines. That's bad practice in VMware.
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